Blog

Coronavirus precautions

If you have a fever, cough, sniffles, cold, or flu symptoms, please let me know so we can reschedule your appointment. There will be no charge for cancellations within 24 hours.

Some of the people who come to our offices are infants, elderly, or otherwise people whose immune systems may not be robust. We want to do what we can to protect them and everyone, including ourselves, from getting sick.

We have tissues in the waiting room and the bathroom and soap for washing your hands. We practitioners wash our hands well between seeing patients. (This was our practice long before coronavirus — it’s part of our training.)

I keep hand sanitizer available to use in my office,  and I use it myself on my hands as soon as I complete an intraoral TMJ treatment and wash them well after each patient leaves. We are wiping down doorknobs, light switches, faucets, and other objects frequently touched as well.

I am 60+ and very healthy. I had a mild, 2-day cold in fall 2019, and I could not remember how long it had been since my previous cold — it was at least 3 years. My immune system appears to be strong.

However, if the coronavirus starts spreading in Austin from person to person, I may decide to put my work on hold, simply because it seems to be more severe for older people and no one knows exactly why.

Thank you for your consideration as we move together through this uncertainty.

Educating dental office staff about treating jaw issues

Last year, I took a some classes about making presentations, and I focused on educating dental office staff about what I do in my TMJ Relief work.

Last week, I participated in a lunch-and-learn at the office of my wonderful dentist, Dr. Elizabeth Rayne. I talked about what I do and got to ask them some questions about what they do.

For instance, when people grind their teeth during sleep, they may not be aware of it. However, the dental office staff sees the results of grinding.

The staff then has to tell the patient that their sleep habit is damaging their teeth. Not good news to hear, especially when it means they need crowns.

Since my specialty as a massage therapist is in relieving muscle tension, after taking some advanced courses, I can help relieve tension in the jaw muscles and the pain it causes.

As someone who’s also trained in behavioral change (NLP), I can help people learn habit change.

Learning the techniques I use, getting advanced training, tweaking my protocol, and working on person after person since 2013 make up the manual therapy part of my work.

I’ve worked on people who have suffered for most of their lives, for twenty, thirty, even forty years.

That’s a lot of suffering. Being able to make a difference is hugely rewarding.

My work mission has broadened to include educating professionals and the public about manual therapy for jaw issues. At least half of my TMJ patients had never received manual therapy for jaw pain before they learned about me, through word of mouth. They didn’t know it existed.

I can relieve jaw pain, help people open wider, and help get their jaws aligned for better appliance fit. How would that affect a dental practice?

Readers, I f you know of any dental offices in the Austin area interested having me do a lunch-and-learn with staff, please connect. I will follow up.

Community Healing Circle on March 7

I’ll be offering Ayurvedic face massages at the March 7 Community Healing Circle.

I just served as a teaching assistant for my friend Margo Uma Gal’s class at The Lauterstein-Conway Massage School. The class sold out with a wait list of 12. She’ll be teaching it again next winter, and you do not need to be a massage therapist to take it.

These face massages are slow, gentle, calming, and balancing, stimulating marma points to release blocked energies. (Many of us hold tension in our faces.)

Other benefits include promoting good sleep, improving mental alertness, and lymphatic drainage.

I use a small amount of a special oil blend, depending on your constitution.

To participate, just show up at Zero Gravity Yoga and Wellness and sign up for the healer and time slot you choose. The earlier you come (starts at 6 pm), the better chance you have of not having to wait — although waiting amid the pleasant company and healing vibe is lovely. It makes a lovely thing to do with a friend or date, and there will be multiple healing modalities to choose from.

Suggested donation for a 25-minute session is $25-35, with proceeds going to local nonprofits. More information is available on Facebook. https://facebook.com/events/s/march-into-wellness/230021528015078/?ti=icl

Speaking about my work…

Today I have the good fortune to be interviewed on Mind Body Radio at 10-10:15 am CST. You can listen on the Internet live or find my interview afterwards. Here’s the link: https://mindbodyradio.com.

Sunday I hosted a brown bag education session on craniosacral therapy for 10 of my fellow members of the Austin Wellness Collaborative. I spoke for about an hour about how I got into CST, its evolution and branches, and answered questions. Then I did a demo, talking about what I was doing and sensing, on a fellow AWC member, who also commented on what she was noticing. Success!

Coming up, on January 29 I will be talking to the staff at the office of Dr. Elizabeth Raine, DDS (my own dentist) about what I do and asking questions about what they notice and how they work with TMJ issues. This will be my first talk with a dental office.

It feels good to be doing more educational work, continuing to get the word out that skilled manual therapy can relieve TMJ symptoms.

If you know of an opportunity to educate, please keep me in mind.