What are the different kinds of craniosacral therapy?

Dr. William Garner Sutherland, DO, 1873-1954, devoted his osteopathic medical career to exploring the craniosacral system, which surrounds the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system).

The whole field started in 1899 when Sutherland, then a medical student, noticed that the cranial bones seemed designed to breathe, which he explored after becoming a doctor.

His earlier focus was on the bones, fluids, and membranes of the system, a biomechanical way of working.

His research, which he labeled the cranial concept, resulted in the development of the medical specialty of cranial osteopathy.

Dr. Sutherland and other cranial osteopaths that he trained noticed that the fluid in this system moved rhythmically, like tides, influencing every cell from deep inside the body.

They recognized that dynamic processes in the tides could augment the health and vitality of the entire human system.

This way of working with the system’s capacity to seek health came to be called biodynamic. It includes and expands on Dr. Sutherland’s earlier discoveries about the biomechanics of the system.

In the 1970s, Dr. John Upledger, DO, began to teach non-doctors how to work on people biomechanically, based on Dr. Sutherland’s earlier work. He coined the term craniosacral therapy.

Legend has it that Dr. Upledger was well aware of the biodynamic aspects of the work, and that he chose to teach just the biomechanical aspects to make it more acceptable to the general public and the mainstream medical establishment of the day.

Today the Upledger Institute is an internationally known and respected training and research facility. Its teachers have taught craniosacral therapy to multitudes of practitioners and benefitted millions of receivers around the planet.

I’ve taken courses with the Upledger Institute and plan to take more.

Franklyn Sills, while an osteopathic student in the 1980s, became fascinated with Dr. Sutherland’s later work and that of other cranial osteopaths whom he taught, which was more holistic at a time when holistic healing modalities were beginning to emerge in Western culture.

Sills began teaching biodynamic craniosacral therapy to non-doctors in the 1990s. Read his history of craniosacral biodynamics here.

My current Biodynamics teacher, Roger Gilchrist, studied and trained to teach with Franklyn Sills.

I’ve previously studied both biomechanical and biodynamic CST with Ryan Hallford, creator of The Craniosacral Podcast who is now teaching internationally for Body Intelligence as well as independently.


I invite you to work with me!

MaryAnn Reynolds, MS, LMT, BCTMB
Austin, Texas
Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy • TMJ Relief
online scheduler: maryannreynolds.as.me
text or voicemail: 512-507-4184

The alchemy of touch

My training in the alchemy of touch will end tomorrow, Sunday, May 20. It is beyond thrilling to be extending my bodywork skills into a realm of deeper magic and alchemy.

In bodywork, that translates into quantum-like jumps of transformation, and Zero Balancing is already the most transformative type of bodywork I offer for the shortest amount of time, 30 minutes with you fully clothed.

A mysterious blend of osteopathic manual therapy and Chinese medicine and a few other influences, Zero Balancing (ZB) works with your bones to affect both your structure and your energy.

Here’s a video of Zero Balancing creator Fritz Smith talking about his background and how Zero Balancing is a blend of Eastern and Western traditions, as well as Newtonian (particle) and quantum (wave) physics.  Continue reading “The alchemy of touch”

What people say after a Zero Balancing session

I just finished my fourth class in Zero Balancing, and so I am eligible to apply for certification.

The part I love most about giving my clients a Zero Balancing session comes after the fully-clothed bodywork has concluded, when the receiver slowly moves from supine on my massage table to sidelying to seated to standing, taking a pause after each movement, and finally takes a few steps around my office.

I ask, “What are you noticing?”

People pay exquisite attention to their own sensations, and I collect their descriptions, eagerly anticipating what they will say. Often they tell me with a sense of revelation that they feel:

Taller.

Lighter.

In less pain.

Less stress.

Having better posture.

Having better movement.

Expanded.

More aligned.

Looser in the tight places.

Stretched.

Their depression has gone to neutral.

More solid on the ground.

Less timid.

Not stuck.

More in their body.

More grounded.

Breathing in their back too.

In touch with their heaviness.

Zero Balancing works on both structure and energy, and you can definitely see that in these descriptions. Of course, structure and energy affect each other.

Zero Balancing is the most transformative type of bodywork I’ve received or given for the amount of time spent on the table, which is usually 30-45 minutes. The changes are simply not on the same level as, “Oh, my shoulders don’t feel so tight” or “My low back pain is gone.”

Those things happen, and ZB recipients experience themselves differently, more as whole-body energetic free beings. Many people rarely experience themselves as such. Working with the deepest layer, the bones, frees up so much.

It’s the modality that helps people experience complete embodiment in a positive way, as if they are healthy and well, and the universe is a kind and friendly place to be. No wonder it’s becoming a sought-after experience!

Maybe it’s more spiritual for one person and more grounding for another. It seems to be a little bit different for everyone, and different each time. And that makes sense because our needs and awareness all vary.

Who would not want to live deeply in and from their body when it feels like this?