What are the different kinds of craniosacral therapy?

Dr. William Garner Sutherland, DO, 1873-1954, devoted his osteopathic medical career to exploring the craniosacral system, which surrounds the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system).

The whole field started in 1899 when Sutherland, then a medical student, noticed that the cranial bones seemed designed to breathe, which he explored after becoming a doctor.

His earlier focus was on the bones, fluids, and membranes of the system, a biomechanical way of working.

His research, which he labeled the cranial concept, resulted in the development of the medical specialty of cranial osteopathy.

Dr. Sutherland and other cranial osteopaths that he trained noticed that the fluid in this system moved rhythmically, like tides, influencing every cell from deep inside the body.

They recognized that dynamic processes in the tides could augment the health and vitality of the entire human system.

This way of working with the system’s capacity to seek health came to be called biodynamic. It includes and expands on Dr. Sutherland’s earlier discoveries about the biomechanics of the system.

In the 1970s, Dr. John Upledger, DO, began to teach non-doctors how to work on people biomechanically, based on Dr. Sutherland’s earlier work. He coined the term craniosacral therapy.

Legend has it that Dr. Upledger was well aware of the biodynamic aspects of the work, and that he chose to teach just the biomechanical aspects to make it more acceptable to the general public and the mainstream medical establishment of the day.

Today the Upledger Institute is an internationally known and respected training and research facility. Its teachers have taught craniosacral therapy to multitudes of practitioners and benefitted millions of receivers around the planet.

I’ve taken courses with the Upledger Institute and plan to take more.

Discoveries in quantum physics spilled over into more mainstream acceptance of phenomena unexplainable by the old Newtonian model, paving the way for a more holistic way of understanding everything.

Franklyn Sills, while an osteopathic student in the 1980s, became fascinated with Dr. Sutherland’s later work and that of other cranial osteopaths whom he taught, which was more holistic at a time when holistic healing modalities were beginning to emerge in Western culture.

Sills began teaching biodynamic craniosacral therapy to non-doctors in the 1990s. Read his history of craniosacral biodynamics here.

My current Biodynamics teacher, Roger Gilchrist, studied and trained to teach with Franklyn Sills.

I’ve previously studied both biomechanical and biodynamic CST with Ryan Hallford, creator of The Craniosacral Podcast who is now teaching internationally for Body Intelligence as well as independently.

Your feedback appreciated!

I recently heard from someone who received a TMJ session from me, which includes craniosacral therapy, that after our session, her left ear “opened up”. She said her hearing in that ear had had a muffled quality to it for years, and that the session with me had restored her clear hearing. She was delighted. So was I. She came in for jaw tension.

Transformation continues to occur after a bodywork recipient leaves my office. Their mind may turn to other matters, but I wonder what else they experience in the hours and days after a session that improves their quality of life that I may never learn about, because next time they come in, they’ve forgotten.

I love to thank my clients for coming in for a session. I am so grateful that I get to do this for a living. It’s an honor to be trusted and a challenge to live up to that.

I’m changing the day that thank-you email gets sent. Instead of sending it the day after the session, I’ll be sending it two days later.

Besides conveying my gratitude, I hope to learn whether the work helped someone sleep better, improved their performance at work, increased mental clarity, affected their mood, improved their sensing abilities, resolved a different physical issue, balanced their energy, deepened their sense of self, or anything else — whether it was the goal of the session or not.

My business is transformation, and I am endlessly curious about it. The human body/mind/field/system is so complex, it’s like the flap of that butterfly’s wings in Brazil contributing to a tornado in Texas. I can’t always take credit for what actually happens, but I do like to know about it, as much as we can know.