Shorter office hours this week

I’ll be out of the office on Friday and Saturday this week — I’m participating in a night walking retreat at the Canyon of the Eagles Friday through Sunday. (I’ve done it before, so will miss the first day. There’s still room if you’re interested in (1) something different, (2) something relaxing, (3) removing yourself from the hustle and bustle, (4) learning a lifelong skill that you can use to relieve anxiety, (5) nature, trees, woods, water, dark skies, the beginning of the Geminid meteor shower,

I have openings on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and in addition to everything else, I am offering $25 off on my Heavenly Head Massage. It’s the antidote for stress that brings relaxation like you wouldn’t believe! That discount applies to gift certificates too!

Who doesn’t love a head massage? Check it out and help me name it!

After spending 4 days recently taking a class called “Addressing the Skull,” I want to get you onto my massage table so I can practice, practice, practice! It’s the best way I know to integrate training into, well, my advanced integrative bodywork practice.

I also need your help naming this new addition to my repertoire. I want to describe it separately from a Zero Balancing session. In my view, a ZB session addresses the whole body, including the head, whereas a skull/cranium/crown session spends most of a 45-minute session on the head.

This was a class in Zero Balancing, which aligns your structure and frees your energy, but most of the session will be spent addressing your skull. I learned lots of secrets of the skull, including that working on the outside of the skull affects the inside, i.e., the brain. And it’s not exactly a massage. It uses artful touch and knowledge of anatomy to find those places that release tension you may not have even known you had.

For instance, there is a place behind your ears that is similar to that place where dogs love to be petted, behaving as if they could never get enough, leg twitching and groaning with pleasure.

There are several special places on your skull where two or three or four bones come together that just love to be touched.

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 8.45.55 AM

I imagine that everyone in the class experienced several releases of tension in their skulls that they were not aware of before. We can get so habituated to stress that it gets normalized. Guess what? Normal can be better. (Thanks to San Antonio ZBer Jamie Carmody for making “Make normal better” her tagline.)

I suspect this work may prevent headaches and migraines.

After four days of training, which included many trades, my friend and I noticed that we could see better. When looking into our training room, the 3D-ness of everything was in sharper relief, and everything had more clarity. Working on the head affects all the senses.

This is your brain, on ZB.

I plan to run this special for a couple of weeks, and may consider extending it after that. I’ve lowered my price by $25 for a 45-minute Zero Balancing session. Go here to book yours.

In training later this week

I’m taking a long-awaited class in Zero Balancing November 1-4 at the Lauterstein-Conway Massage School. It’s called “Zero Balancing Expanded: Addressing the Skull.” This is the first time it’s being taught in Austin, and five ZB teachers who are training to teach this course worldwide are coming to participate as teaching assistants.

I will be out of the office Thursday afternoon, all day Friday, and all day Saturday this week. I return to the office on Tuesday, November 6, so if you’re thinking of booking an appointment this week, make it Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday morning.

Screen Shot 2018-10-29 at 10.02.40 PMAlthough the teacher, Judith Sullivan of Charlottesville, VA, is an accomplished craniosacral therapist and teacher of craniosacral therapy through the Upledger Institute, I’ve read her book Zero Balancing Expanded: The Attitude of Awaiting a Fish, and it is not about craniosacral therapy. It is more about the artful places that therapists can touch the skull that Judith has learned from decades of practice. It uses ZB principles to release stuck energy.

We all realize that our skulls/heads/craniums are extraordinary places on our bodies. The head is a huge ground for discovery. This training is so needed.

If you know me at all, you know I love integrating techniques after listening to what the body needs. What I learn in this class will be fun to experiment with and a huge addition to my skull-oriented skills.

I am mailing in my application to become certified in Zero Balancing to get the ball rolling on that process. I am so pleased to include this modality in my repertoire. I do stand-alone ZB sessions, and I integrate it with biodynamics, TMJ Relief, and more. It makes so much sense to get the body’s structure aligned and energy flowing and then build on that.

If you’re not familiar with ZB but are intrigued, it is a blend of traditional Chinese medicine and manual osteopathic therapy. It began being developed in the 1970s.

I don’t pretend to understand how it works, but it’s the most transformative technique I know for the time spent doing it (20-45 minutes).

To understand the range of responses, read my previous post, What People Say After a Zero Balancing Session.

Treating TMJ issues: what various professions do to help

I’m going to write about what various healing professions do to treat TMJ issues to help you be good consumers and know what to expect in terms of results. I am a massage therapist who specializes in TMJ work, including intra-oral (inside the mouth) work, in which I’ve had special training.

I want to say up front that most massage therapists do not work inside the mouth, which is where the jaw muscles most likely to be causing TMJ pain are located. Most massage therapists have the skills to release tension in the external jaw and neck muscles. Maybe that’s all you need, if your jaw pain isn’t severe and it comes and goes. You will feel better after such sessions.

But if you are really suffering from chronic or severe jaw pain and dysfunction, you probably want a lot more than that. You will greatly benefit from intra-oral work, which takes special training and experience to do effectively.

Do not hesitate to ask whether a therapist you are considering working with is trained in releasing tension in the internal jaw muscles and uses gloves or finger cots.

Whole-body work can also help, when the TMJ pain is related to your posture (for instance, head forward posture).

These are the major results that help with TMJ symptoms, along with the professional training that can provide them:

  • reducing stress (massage therapist, acupuncturist, yoga teacher, meditation teacher)
  • reducing tension in your external jaw muscles (massage therapist)
  • releasing trigger points in your external jaw muscles (any kind of therapist with trigger point release training)
  • releasing your neck tension (massage therapist, physical therapist, chiropractor)
  • getting your pelvis aligned and balanced (massage therapist, physical therapist, chiropractor)
  • preventing your teeth from cracking due to bruxism (dentist)
  • reducing tension in your internal jaw muscles (massage therapist with special training, physical therapist with special training, Rolfer)
  • getting craniosacral therapy to restore alignment in the external cranial bones (craniosacral therapist)
  • getting craniosacral therapy to restore alignment in the internal cranial bones (craniosacral therapist)
  • repairing a torn or perforated articular disk (oral surgeon — get reviews first)
  • getting whole-body therapy to help with alignment and release strain patterns (craniosacral therapist, Rolfer, Zero Balancer, yoga teacher, yoga therapist)

This is a brief and imperfect overview to help you get the results you want, and there are many fine points not mentioned here.

 

The alchemy of touch

My training in the alchemy of touch will end tomorrow, Sunday, May 20. It is beyond thrilling to be extending my bodywork skills into a realm of deeper magic and alchemy.

In bodywork, that translates into quantum-like jumps of transformation, and Zero Balancing is already the most transformative type of bodywork I offer for the shortest amount of time, 30 minutes with you fully clothed.

A mysterious blend of osteopathic manual therapy and Chinese medicine and a few other influences, Zero Balancing (ZB) works with your bones to affect both your structure and your energy.

Here’s a video of Zero Balancing creator Fritz Smith talking about his background and how Zero Balancing is a blend of Eastern and Western traditions, as well as Newtonian (particle) and quantum (wave) physics.  Continue reading “The alchemy of touch”