New: extended evening hours

I’ve been intensifying my yoga practice for the past few months, working with some amazing teachers, and since my yoga classes are mostly on weekday mornings, which cuts into my office hours, I’ve decided to stay open later three days a week.

Yes, I am totally going to be one of those amazing old ladies that are adept at yoga.

A few people have requested this, and I’m making it happen!

New hours:

  • Tuesday: open until 7 pm
  • Wednesday: open until 8 pm
  • Tuesday: open until 7 pm

Friday hours will remain the same, open until 6 pm.

I started practicing yoga (asana) in the early 1980s, when it wasn’t nearly as popular as it is now. It was particularly helpful after a 1996 car accident and again when I did sedentary work. Now I love doing it for the strength, flexibility, alignment, balance, awareness, and good company of fellow yogis.

Yoga has given me resources in my bodywork practice that I am deeply grateful for. I believe it opens up the body’s energy channels to deepen presence and experience oneness — yoga means union. It makes a great companion to meditation.

How to Work with Me

If you are feeling sluggish, stiff, depleted, head achy, jaw achy, face achy, stressed, tense, hurting, lacking vitality, needing nurturing touch or to be listened to at a deep level, I can help. Also, many folks are just plain curious about receiving these special modalities I offer — craniosacral therapy, biodynamics, and Zero Balancing.

You can peruse my website or click Book An Appointment! and book your session online, start a monthly subscription (save $15 per session if you purchase this before June 21), schedule your free 30-minute TMJ Relief consultation, get started with the 5-session TMJ Relief program, buy 6-session packages for 45 or 75 minutes, and buy a discounted gift certificate for a Heavenly Head Massage for that person who really needs one — including yourself.

NEW! If you have any questions, you can now schedule a phone consultation of up to 15 minutes. Because my ringer is usually off (I’m working or got too darn many robocalls), this is an easy way for us to set aside time to chat on the phone. You schedule the phone consultation as you would schedule an appointment, and I will call you at the appointed time so we can chat.

I appreciate you, and I want to help! 

~~~

Trivia of the day: Did you know that Ida Rolf — who contributed so much to American manual therapy there’s a whole body of work called Rolfing — was a yogi? According to my source, she called it “yog” in the manner where the final “a” is dropped in Sanskrit.

Treating TMJ issues: sleep posture

Are you aware that there is a pillow specially designed for people with TMJ and neck issues? I’ve had one for several years, and I love it. I take it with me when I travel and when I camp. Since I started using it, I’ve never woken up with neck or jaw pain.

It’s the Therapeutica Sleeping pillow, designed by a chiropractor and an ergonomic designer. It’s…different-looking.

Screen Shot 2018-07-13 at 6.51.17 PM

It’s designed for people who sleep on their sides or their back.

I don’t believe there are any pillows designed for stomach sleepers, which is hard on the neck and not great for your organs either.

This pillow comes in five sizes, and you order the size that fits your shoulder width. The proper-sized pillow keeps your head and neck aligned with your spine. Since we spend a third of our lives sleeping, this is important! Good sleep posture makes a difference over time, resulting in fewer neck and jaw issues.

Screen Shot 2018-07-13 at 6.55.05 PM

The indentations on the “wings” relieve pressure on your jaw when side-sleeping. Some users also find it helps with shoulder issues.

The pillow comes with a 5-year warranty not to lose its shape or resilience, and many users have used it long beyond 5 years. I put a king-size pillowcase on my average size pillow, which comes with a zippered case.

At $86.99 for an average size, the Therapeutica Sleeping Pillow is expensive for a pillow. If you average it out over 5 years, though, you pay less than $20 per year for child, petite, average, and large adult sizes, and about $22 for extra large. When you look at it that way, it seems totally reasonable to spend this much on a pillow.

Note the link above is for the average size. Be sure to measure and get the size that’s designed for your shoulder width.

Are you a back sleeper? It’s the recommended sleep position for people with TMD. The back-sleeping-only pillow is called the Travel Pillow, and it comes in three sizes.

On Amazon, read the reviews and the Q&A. Note that not everyone likes this pillow. I believe you should try it for a week before deciding, because it may be very different from what you’ve been sleeping on, and therefore it will take time for your body to adjust. You can and will adjust if you give yourself time.

Your flexible spending account may cover the cost, so check on that if you have one. With Amazon, you can use an app like Honey that watches for price changes and notifies you via email if the price drops within 60 days.

For more on TMD and sleep, check out these sites:

If you’ve found relief from TMJ pain using this or a different pillow, please share in the comments.

Treating TMJ issues: the role of the sphenoid in structural health

The sphenoid bone is one of the most fascinating bones in the body! If you were looking at someone and could see their bones, the sphenoid would be behind their eyes and in front of their ears, with the outermost parts (the greater wings) accessible at the temples, and the lowermost parts (the pterygoid processes) being what your internal jaw muscles attach to.

By the way, the word sphenoid comes from the Greek for wedge-shaped. Its shape has been likened to a moth, a bat, a butterfly, and a wasp.

Here’s a picture of it, as viewed from the front.

Screen Shot 2018-07-10 at 8.53.53 AM
Credit: TeachMeAnatomy

It’s a central cranial bone that does many important things:

  • it connects to your internal jaw muscles
  • muscles involved in swallowing are attached to it
  • it helps form the orbits of your eyes
  • the optic nerves meet, cross, and pass through it
  • your pituitary (master gland) sit on top of it (in a saddle!)
  • it contains two air sinuses, the sphenoidal sinuses, which open into the nasal cavity through the ethmoid bone
  • it has openings for major blood vessels and nerves of the head and neck
  • the tentorium cerebelli, part of the membranous system surrounding the central nervous system down to the sacrum, attaches to the sphenoid

The sphenoid has been called the keystone bone. It touches 12 other cranial bones: two parietals, two temporals, two zygomas, two palatines, frontal, occipital, ethmoid, and vomer.

The place where the sphenoid and occiput meet is called the sphenobasilar joint (SBJ). (The occiput is considered the base of the cranium.) You can see the SBJ in the middle of the image below where the orange and yellow bones meet.

Screen Shot 2018-07-10 at 8.58.35 AM
Credit: TeachMeAnatomy

The alignment of this joint is important. William Sutherland, DO, father of cranial osteopathy, believed that the rest of the skeletal system moves to accommodate the SBJ. If the two bones are not aligned well, it can affect the endocrine, nervous, and cardiovascular systems as well.

Misalignment of the SBJ can obviously affect other cranial bones, which fit closely together. It can contribute to TMJ pain and dysfunction.

When the SBJ is misaligned, it affects the jaw. (Remember, your internal jaw muscles attach to it.) It is also a consideration in migraines, headaches, sinus problems and allergies, pain in the head, neck, and back, scoliosis, issues with eye movements, and problems with behavior, personality, learning, coordination, hormones, and emotions.

This is how the sphenoid bone can affect the structure of the body. Craniosacral therapists pay a lot of attention to the sphenoid and can gently move it into better alignment. I like to end TMJ Relief sessions with a gentle adjustment to the sphenoid and a stillpoint to let the body integrate the new alignment.

Treating TMJ issues: what various professions do to help

I’m going to write about what various healing professions do to treat TMJ issues to help you be good consumers and know what to expect in terms of results. I am a massage therapist who specializes in TMJ work, including intra-oral (inside the mouth) work, in which I’ve had special training.

I want to say up front that most massage therapists do not work inside the mouth, which is where the jaw muscles most likely to be causing TMJ pain are located. Most massage therapists have the skills to release tension in the external jaw and neck muscles. Maybe that’s all you need, if your jaw pain isn’t severe and it comes and goes. You will feel better after such sessions.

But if you are really suffering from chronic or severe jaw pain and dysfunction, you probably want a lot more than that. You will greatly benefit from intra-oral work, which takes special training and experience to do effectively.

Do not hesitate to ask whether a therapist you are considering working with is trained in releasing tension in the internal jaw muscles and uses gloves or finger cots.

Whole-body work can also help, when the TMJ pain is related to your posture (for instance, head forward posture).

These are the major results that help with TMJ symptoms, along with the professional training that can provide them:

  • reducing stress (massage therapist, acupuncturist, yoga teacher, meditation teacher)
  • reducing tension in your external jaw muscles (massage therapist)
  • releasing trigger points in your external jaw muscles (any kind of therapist with trigger point release training)
  • releasing your neck tension (massage therapist, physical therapist, chiropractor)
  • getting your pelvis aligned and balanced (massage therapist, physical therapist, chiropractor)
  • preventing your teeth from cracking due to bruxism (dentist)
  • reducing tension in your internal jaw muscles (massage therapist with special training, physical therapist with special training, Rolfer)
  • getting craniosacral therapy to restore alignment in the external cranial bones (craniosacral therapist)
  • getting craniosacral therapy to restore alignment in the internal cranial bones (craniosacral therapist)
  • repairing a torn or perforated articular disk (oral surgeon — get reviews first)
  • getting whole-body therapy to help with alignment and release strain patterns (craniosacral therapist, Rolfer, Zero Balancer, yoga teacher, yoga therapist)

This is a brief and imperfect overview to help you get the results you want, and there are many fine points not mentioned here.

 

Treating TMJ issues: the jaw-pelvis connection

The jaw-pelvis connection is real! When I ask my TMD (temporomandibular disorder) clients if they also have pelvic alignment issues, most of them say yes. If your pelvis is out of alignment, most often so is your jaw, and vice versa.

When receiving bodywork to get one area realigned, the other often follows. Sometimes I have one hand in your mouth and the other on your pelvis.

Here’s how that relationship works: The pelvis includes the root of the spine, your sacrum. Your jaw — mandible — is near the upper end of your spine, and it has a special relationship with C1 and C2, the uppermost vertebrae of your spine.

Because the opening/closing motion of the jaw is both hinging and gliding, the axis of rotation is not in the TMJs but is between these two vertebrae (Guzay’s theorem). When your jaw is misaligned, it affects these vertebrae, impacting spinal and head posture and neurological well-being.

How does that happen? The dura mater is a tough, inelastic membrane that lines the inside of your cranium and forms a loose sheath surrounding the spinal cord that is attached to C1, C2, and C3 and then descends all the way down to the sacrum.

When the jaw is not aligned, it torques the dura mater at the upper end of the spine, which translates all the way down to the sacrum. This torquing can cause scoliosis, lordosis, kyphosis, pelvic rotation, head tilt, and cranial bone misalignment, which can affect your endocrine system and spinal nerves.

Conversely, a pelvic injury can affect the jaw. If your pelvis is giving you problems, put your fingers in front of your ears and open and close your jaw. Notice if your left and right TMJs feel different or the same. You may notice one side opens first or is more restricted or otherwise moves asymmetrically. You may not have pain, however.

Maybe this is why nine times more women than men suffer from TMJ disorders. Women tend to have more issues with their pelvic floors as well as hormonal imbalances. Who knows which came first?

Coming soon: more about the relationship between the jaw and the endocrine system.