Policies

Welcome.

I’m here to do my best for you. In this line of work, we are always seeking more health. You are too, or you wouldn’t be here. I look forward to working together.

Please read through my policies. I’m happy to answer any questions you have.

Appointments

Bodywork sessions are by appointment only. You may schedule your own appointment online. You may also contact me first (preferably scheduling a free phone consultation) if you have any questions.

Please try to arrive 5 minutes early to decompress before your session. If possible, allow yourself some down-time after your session to integrate.

Your appointment time is reserved exclusively for you. I send a reminder email and text 48 hours in advance of your start time.

If you need to reschedule, please be kind and do so as soon as possible. You may reschedule online or by emailing, texting, or leaving a voicemail for me.

If you miss an appointment with less than 24 hours of notice, you will be responsible for full payment for the session.

Rates

Initial appointments and 90 minute sessions: $165.

Follow-up appointments/60 minute sessions: $135.

Multi-session packages and subscriptions are discounted by 10 percent.

Payment

When you schedule yourself online, you prepay with a credit card.

If you prefer to pay with cash, check made out to MaryAnn Reynolds, or a cash app, I will need to schedule your session for you.

Special instructions for American Express cards: enter the card number minus the last digit. Then enter the four-digit CVV code. Then enter the last digit of the credit card number. If this doesn’t work, try another type of card or ask me to send you a payment request in PayPal or Venmo.

I accept Health Care Savings Account and Flexible Spending Account cards.

Tips are not accepted. I do appreciate feedback (both positive and about how I can improve), and spreading the word to others in person or in writing about a good experience is deeply appreciated.

I do not work with insurance companies, but if you request a receipt, I can provide one after your session(s) that you can submit to your insurance company or HCSA/FSA plan for reimbursement.

Packages and subscriptions

Multi-session packages and subscriptions are discounted by 10 percent.

Packages never expire, though some are best used with the time limitations specified, and they are non-refundable.

If you buy a package and cannot use all the sessions, you may request a gift certificate for the balance. 

Subscriptions are for regular sessions, either weekly, twice-monthly, or monthly. Missed subscription appointments do not roll over and are not refundable. Subscriptions do not expire until you cancel, and you may also restart any time. 

Package and subscription prices remain the same for the duration of the package or subscription, regardless of fee increases. 

If you would like to request a package, gift certificate, or subscription not listed, please contact MaryAnn at 512-507-4184.

COVID policy

When Austin/Travis County is in Stage 4 or 5, masks are required at all times in the office suite and in my private office, regardless of vaccination status.

The only exception is during the intraoral portion of TMJ Relief sessions. I require you to be fully vaccinated (preferably with booster) to receive intraoral work. I will ask you to rinse and swish your mouth thoroughly with an antiseptic solution before working in your mouth.

If you are not vaccinated, I can offer a TMJ Relief session without the intraoral work. Since half your jaw muscles are on the outside of your head, it will be helpful.

I run a Winix air filter at all times when I am working.

If you have a sore throat, fever, or other symptoms of illness, please reschedule your session.

In Stage 3 or below, you may be unmasked inside my private office and I will ask you if you are comfortable with me unmasking. (I’m triple vaxxed.)

Biodynamic craniosacral therapy: what’s in a name?

Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy is a very long name for a type of body- and energy-work.

Craniosacral Biodynamics is shorter, and Biodynamics is even shorter.

It’s also known as BCST.

One of my clients calls it “Bio D”.

The name Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy reflects its evolutionary path from osteopathy to “the cranial concept” to cranial osteopathy and then to biodynamic cranial osteopathy, craniosacral therapy, and now biodynamic craniosacral therapy over the past 150 years.

None of these names tell you much about what it does, if you are unfamiliar with this type of session.

With that in mind, here are some terms that describe what this type of bodywork is capable of doing:

  • Balancing your systems
  • Strengthening your innate healing processes
  • Resetting your nervous system
  • Releasing strain patterns from experiences of overwhelm, shock, and/or trauma
  • Quantum healing
  • Spiritual bodywork
  • Healing from the inside out

The etymology of the word comes from the Greek bio– meaning life and dynamis– meaning power.

Hence, biodynamics refers to life power.

Synonyms for biodynamics include chi flow, vital energy, core energy, energy of life, vital essence.

As an adjective, biodynamic means “of, or relating to, the effects of motion on living things”.

The Craniosacral part of the name reflects the fluctuation of cerebrospinal fluid around the brain and spinal cord — the body’s craniosacral system, from cranium to sacrum.

This motion deep within the body affects all the tissues, fluids, and energies in the body. A trained therapist can palpate this motion.

The therapist gets grounded, centered, neutral, and receptive so she can perceive these rhythms and tides in your tissues, fluids, and energy field.

Tuning in, she develops rapport with the health in your system and how it expresses itself, allowing the intelligence in your system to pause and reflect on unresolved conditions and seek new, healthier patterns.

What conditions is Biodynamic Craniosacral therapy helpful with?

  • Trauma
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Chronic stress
  • Emotional disorders
  • PTSD
  • Pain
  • Chronic conditions

Because BCST is so gentle and non-invasive, there are few contraindications for treatment. The number of sessions needed can vary, and anyone can enjoy the benefits of a session.

Because the rapport between client and therapist deepens with each session, at least three sessions are recommended for most.

Living in your hands

This post quotes Mark Nepo’s lovely book, The Book of Awakening, which has a reading for each day of the year.

The reading for May 2 starts with this:

Live in your hands
and your mind will learn
to bow like a root.

Nepo’s friend had studied in depth the heart and the mind and the give/take and push/pull between them. A very old sage’s last instructions to her were to “Live in your hands.”

His friend, who didn’t know anything about stonework, found herself building a stone chapel, the chapel that had been waiting in her heart.

Another friend must touch flowers she sees. He watches and notices that doing this opens her a little further.

“To live in our hands humbles our mind into accepting something other than itself. It is how we heal each other and ourselves. We call come alive through a Braille of heart.”

This speaks to me so deeply. I work with my hands. I didn’t used to. When I work, I live in them. I am so much more alive and connected to life than I was.

Go touch some flowers. Give someone a foot or neck massage. Connect your hands to a tree. Or just close your eyes and pay attention to your hands’ sensations.

Comments enabled and welcome

I just learned that dozens of people left comments from the Contact page of this website that I didn’t know about. Some of them went back to 2017.

Some of you contacted me by phone, and we tended to the issue. I have not heard back from everyone who left a comment, however. I am sorry if you left a comment and never heard back from me.

I have fixed the problem so that now I get an email notification if someone leaves a comment.

Moving up the learning curve…MaryAnn.

Massage therapy for jaw pain

The January/February 2019 issue of Massage & Bodywork (magazine for massage therapists) includes the article “Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: Biting Off More Than We Can Chew”. It’s full of information about the anatomy, pathology, demographics, contributing factors, symptoms, and treatment options for TMJD. The author is Ruth Werner, who wrote A Massage Therapist’s Guide to Pathology.

The article mentions that many dental professionals enthusiastically recommend massage therapy as an early intervention for TMJ disorders, which are often accompanied by dysfunction elsewhere in the body — the shoulder girdle, pelvis, and feet, for example.   Regular massage therapy sessions can also help relieve pain and tension in the external jaw muscles.

The author states, “The [internal] pterygoid muscles require more specialized skill… Work inside the mouth carries some serious responsibilities… It’s not for beginners, and it’s not for dabbling. When things go wrong in this joint, problems can reverberate through the whole body… [Massage therapists working inside the mouth should] get advanced training…

“Intraoral massage may trigger unintended responses… Emotional release in response to work in and around the mouth is also a strong possibility. It is critical that massage therapists be mindful of their scope of practice and respectful of their clients’ processes if this happens. Massage therapists must be prepared to be present, nonjudgmental, and appropriately supportive for this kind of event. Once again, it’s not for dabblers. If you want to do this work, get appropriate training.”

After reading this, I feel good about what I do. Massage therapists trained to work inside the mouth mostly follow three paths of advanced training: craniosacral therapy (like me), neuromuscular therapy, and structural integration (aka Rolfing).

Also, not all craniosacral therapists or neuromuscular therapists work with the internal pterygoid muscles, so be sure to ask beforehand if that’s what you expect. That was part of my training with Ryan Hallford, not (so far) with the Upledger Institute.

Also, I’m thanking the Upledger Institute for my training in SomatoEmotional Release as well as past experience and research in trauma recovery.

I’m grateful to see that treatment for TMJ disorders by licensed massage therapists is getting media attention, and that TMJD itself is getting more recognition. The TMJ Association recently announced that the National Institutes of Health have agreed to do more research. It’s very much needed — practitioners know what we don’t know, and it’s a lot.