Who can benefit from craniosacral therapy?

Here’s a link to a good basic description of craniosacral therapy from the Cleveland Clinic.

These are conditions it helps with (and there are more, but these are the most common):

  • Chronic pain.
  • Fibromyalgia.
  • Migraine headache.
  • Complex regional pain syndrome.
  • Stress.
  • Anxiety.
  • Fascial adhesions.
  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Neurodegenerative diseases.
  • Temporo-mandibular joint syndrome (I use an integrative approach).
  • Stroke.
  • Post-concussion syndrome.

(I also treat many who have experienced trauma.)

These are conditions that need a release from a physician before treating:

  • Recent concussion or traumatic brain injury.
  • Cerebral swelling.
  • Structural defects in the cerebellum such as Arnold-Chiari malformation.
  • Brain aneurysm.
  • Blood clots.
  • Any disorder that causes instability of cerebral fluid pressure, flow or build-up.

Reasons people seek Craniosacral Biodynamics

I was curious about the reasons people have sought me out for Craniosacral Biodynamics sessions, so I looked through my intakes for sessions given since December 1, 2021.

It’s now March 29, 2022, so this sample spans nearly four months.

The variety is broad. The range includes working with very specific conditions in the tissues, chronic issues, acute issues, energetic issues, mental and emotional issues, imbalances of all sorts, recovery from medical treatment, recovery from illness, stress, and issues caused by stress.

Adjusting to Invisalign braces

Anxiety

Bell’s Palsy

Chiari malformation

Chronic pain

Depression

Emotional overload

Energetic imbalance

Familial and ancestral imprints

Fatigue, exhaustion, depletion

Feeling compressed energetically

Headaches

Long-haul COVID

Mental stress

Muscle tension

Recharge from cancer treatment

Recovery from surgery

Regular self-care

Relaxation

Strain patterns, habitual tension

Tinnitus

Trauma, PTSD, C-PTSD, childhood abuse, neglect


I invite you to work with me!

MaryAnn Reynolds, MS, LMT, BCTMB
Austin, Texas
Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy • TMJ Relief
online scheduler: maryannreynolds.as.me
text or voicemail: 512-507-4184

Who can benefit from BCST?

What conditions is Biodynamic Craniosacral therapy helpful for?

  • Trauma
  • Overwhelm
  • Shock
  • Headaches
  • Migraines
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Stress
  • Emotional disorders
  • Feeling energetically unbalanced
  • PTSD
  • Pain
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Other chronic conditions

Because BCST is so gentle and non-invasive, there are few contraindications for treatment. It works on the whole system and is especially effective at balancing the autonomic nervous system and allowing strain patterns to release.

The number of sessions needed varies. I recommend three sessions to start, to give this sometimes-subtle modality a fair chance, and then evaluate the benefits.

If you decide to continue with regular sessions, I offer a package that can save on the cost.


I invite you to work with me!

MaryAnn Reynolds, MS, LMT, BCTMB
Austin, Texas
Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy • TMJ Relief
online scheduler: maryannreynolds.as.me
text or voicemail: 512-507-4184

Treating TMJ issues: types, causes, and exercises

I have discovered an excellent source of information about TMJ pain and dysfunction. It’s a great website called Be My Healer offered by a doctor of physical therapy, Sophie Xie.

She’s got a couple of posts about TMJ issues. I am impressed with the quality of her posts in terms of credible information, writing to a lay audience, and her images. You go, Dr. Sophie Xie!

First, this article helps distinguish between types and causes of TMJ dysfunction. In short:

  • Type 1 is arthrogenous TMJ, meaning the problem is related to the functioning of the bony temporomandibular joint. There are two causes: arthritis and disc displacement. She recommends the best treatments for each cause. (Exercises* can help .)
  • Type 2 is myogenous, meaning muscle-related. Causes include bruxism (clenching and/or grinding), muscle imbalance (such as forward head posture, chewing on the same side, playing the violin), and systemic influence causing muscle tension (such as chronic stress, fibromyalgia, PMS).

Dr. Sophie Xie writes, “TMJ massage therapy can help by releasing the tense mastication muscle and provide pain and stress relief. However, you will need to call around to find a massage therapist who is specialized in intraoral release to receive the most targeted treatment.”

Here’s me raising my hand, signaling “Pick me!” I can help with all of the muscle-related types of TMD. I offer intra-oral work, help relieve forward-head posture, and help you relax from stress.

Again, exercises* can also help.

  • Type 3 is idiopathic, referring to a single cause: trauma impacting the joint  from accidents, injuries, dental treatments, even violent laughing or yawning.

Dr. Sophie Xie writes, “Post-traumatic TMJ pain is highly preventable. Early intervention such as physical therapy and massage therapy are excellent in preventing scar formation and muscle stiffness​. Gentle and progressive jaw stretching and exercises* will build a strong muscle function to keep chronic and repetitive TMJ pain away.”

Again, I can help.

*In her post Say goodbye to TMJ pain with these 5 convenient jaw exercises, Dr. Sophie Xie describes and shows (with delightful illustrations) exercises to strengthen and balance your jaw muscles.

She writes, “Most people experience significant TMJ pain reduction with daily exercises after 5-6 weeks. You should experience even faster results if you are also combining TMJ massage therapy with a nightly mouth guard.”

Her website has a contact page if you want to work with her. (I believe she’s practicing in Washington state.)

If you are in Austin, Texas, I’m happy to help.


I invite you to work with me!

MaryAnn Reynolds, MS, LMT, BCTMB
Austin, Texas
Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy • TMJ Relief
online scheduler: maryannreynolds.as.me
text or voicemail: 512-507-4184

Treating TMJ issues: de-stress quickly with these breathing techniques

Learning how to de-stress yourself is huge. Everyone experiences stress. It’s just part of life.

Stress becomes an issue when there’s too much of it, and your system has trouble rebounding resiliently to a calm, alert state.

How is this relevant to TMJ issues? So much TMJ misery is related to chronic and acute stress. It’s one of the major contributors to TMJ issues. People clench and grind due to stress, and stress is always accompanied by muscle tension.

Staying stressed for too long is bad for your well-being. It affects your digestion (including absorption of nutrients and detoxification) and creates unnecessary wear and tear on your vital organs.

I’m talking about bad stress as opposed to good stress, such as anxiety before public speaking, which makes you a better speaker, or the adrenaline you feel when a bad driver nearly hits you that helps you successfully avoid being hit.

In my opinion, bad stress includes most news about politics (just donate money and volunteer for candidates you like) and traumatic events (there’s always something awful happening in the world).

Also, the desire to control others’ behavior can bring about bad stress. Better to focus on accepting them as they are and work on a healthy path for yourself. (Maybe they’ll witness you and want to change themselves.)

You can still care and have a constructive strategy to manage stressors.

You can do these things from a calm, alert state. Imagine that.

The beauty of using a little breathwork to get yourself out of an unhelpful state of stress (any stressor that does not require immediate action) is that breathwork bypasses your mind.

Has “you need to calm down” ever helped anyone to actually calm down, whether it’s yourself or someone else telling you this?

It’s also quick. You can simply do a little breathwork when stressed, and your system starts shifting into parasympathetic mode.

The more you practice it, even when not stressed, the more it gets wired into your neurology.

The physiological sigh

The physiological sigh is breathwork technique that’s getting a lot of attention now. It’s been recognized for 80 years as a behavior people do automatically when claustrophobic and in other stressful situations.

Now you can put it to work for yourself when you need to de-stress yourself.

I learned about it from Dr. Andrew Huberman, a Stanford University professor who runs a neurobiology lab and has a podcast.

In brief, it’s two inhalations through the nose, and one longer exhalation through the mouth. (I think of it as the “sniff sniff ahhhhh” breath.)

Here’s a video demonstrating technique.

Dr. Huberman says sometimes people fall asleep if they do it 15 times in a row, but just three of these physiological sighs are enough to start slowing your heartbeat down in 20-30 seconds.

I nearly always yawn when I do three physiological sighs.

4-7-8 breathing

Another fairly quick breathwork technique for reducing stress is the 4-7-8 breathing (the Relaxing Breath). Dr. Andrew Weil, who has been practicing and writing about holistic health and integrative medicine for 30 years, came up with it.

Dr. Weil recommends doing four of these breath cycles at least twice a day for two months to get the benefits. This wires it into your neurology.

He recommends slowing the cycle down, with the limiting factor being how long you can comfortably hold your breath.

It can also help with cravings and falling asleep.

In essense, you are retraining your nervous system to be more relaxed.

You may become less stressed from using either or both of these techniques and still benefit from receiving a TMJ Relief session to retrain your jaw muscles into relaxation. The breathwork will help your body retrain itself more quickly and prevent relapses.

If you’re ready to have that conversation with me, please connect. I’d love to hear from you.


I invite you to work with me!

MaryAnn Reynolds, MS, LMT, BCTMB
Austin, Texas
Biodynamic Craniosacral Therapy • TMJ Relief
online scheduler: maryannreynolds.as.me
text or voicemail: 512-507-4184